In a startling turn of events, President Donald Trump took the unprecedented step of appointing himself acting Attorney General of the United States. During a hastily arranged Rose Garden ceremony in front of throngs of cheering supporters and stunned reporters, Mr. Trump swore himself in saying, “King Kong ain’t got nothing on me. In fact, he’s very weak on borders, low stamina, low energy. I’ll be a much better attorney general. The best, that’s what all the real Americans are saying.”

This weekend, The Bronfman Center: Hillel at NYU will be hosting an extraordinary NYU Law alum (1963), Saul J. Berman. He is an activist, scholar, and Orthodox Rabbinic leader. He is a widely published scholar, and is currently a professor at Columbia Law School and Yeshiva University’s Stern College. He was active in voter registration drives in Selma in 1965, where he was twice arrested.

There is one topic of conversation dominating the halls of New York University School of Law – the hectic first days of President Donald Trump’s term in office. Following through on his campaign promise to impose a “total and complete shutdown” on Muslim immigration into the United States, Mr. Trump ordered a “travel ban” on citizens from seven Muslim-majority nations in the Middle East (Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen). While much of the law was stayed by multiple federal court rulings, thousands of protesters, including many NYU Law students and alumni, are crying foul.

As you are all no doubt aware, on Friday, President Trump signed an executive order that temporarily bars all refugees into the United States and indefinitely bars all Syrian refugees, and that temporarily bars nearly anyone from seven specified countries (all of which are majority Muslim), regardless of visa type.  On Saturday night, amidst swelling protests at airports around the country, a number of federal courts issued orders temporarily suspending certain aspects of the executive order, pending further litigation.

The high cost of attending law school is on many students’ minds. While some seek out jobs at large law firms to pay down six-figure debt, others enter public interest work and find themselves navigating complex payment assistance programs. Law Students for Economic Justice (LSEJ) recently produced a primer on NYU Law’s loan repayment assistance program (LRAP) that is meant to demystify the process.

Second-year students with a demonstrated commitment to civil liberties and civil rights and strong skills are invited to apply for 2017-2018 Fellowships in the Arthur Garfield Hays Civil Liberties Program. The Program provides 3L students with fellowship support as they complete two substantial placements with non-profit organizations engaged in impact litigation, policy work, or direct services related to civil liberties and civil rights.

I’ll start by saying that I’m someone who believes that you can afford anything if you budget. Since college, I’ve been pretty independent financially. Coming from a family of six I knew that college was expensive. I decided that when I started school I would not ask for money. Not to mention asking wasn’t always an option for me.